In landmark case, anti-union forces take agency fees to the US Supreme Court

Today the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case of monumental importance to the future of public employees.

Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association asks the high court to ban agency fees for all public employee unions. In effect, this could make it so all public employees are under Right to Work.

Michigan public employees are not required to pay agency fees, but we should still pay attention to this case. Why? Because Friedrichs could have far-reaching implications for the U.S. labor movement for decades. It could erode the voices of teachers, nurses, firefighters, police and corrections officers around the nation by weakening their ability to collectively bargain.

“Let’s recognize this case for what it is: the latest attack on unions by wealthy special interests,” MCO President Tom Tylutki said. “It’s another attempt to silence workers by destroying unions.”

These special interests know that when people join together in unions, we make major gains for our families and our communities—like higher pay and investing in public education and in public safety for every family and community—but those victories interfere with these billionaires’ extreme agenda.

They don’t want anyone to stand in the way of their ability to game the tax system, leaving middle-class earners to pick up the tab for schools, elder care and safe streets. They don’t want anyone to stand in the way of their ability to push down pay—forcing hardworking people to rely on food stamps just to feed their families—and then passing the buck to working moms and dads.

Here’s what you can do.

• Sign the petition at http://americaworkstogether.us/petition/

• Share the image below on Facebook and Twitter, and say: When people join together in unions, we make major gains for our families and our communities #WorkTogether #SCOTUS (Click the image, then download.)

AWT_Friedrichs_awt-fb-graphic-04

Thanks for your support!

 

 

 

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